Welcome To My Michael Jackson Site

Michael Jackson News

This page is 'The News Page' so it has all the new Michael jackson news as it happens when it happens !!!!

NEW NEWS !!!!!
--------------------------------------------------
Cooper Owen
ROCK LEGENDS’ actions are held three times a year, in Spring Summer and Autumn. The next auction will take place in London, Denmark Street on Tuesday 5th June 2003 at 4pm. The following autographed items will be on auction: (Lot no.98) Michael Jackson signed "Scream" promo, 1995 £70-£80, (Lot no.99) Michael Jackson signature £100-£150, (Lot no.100) Michael Jackson signature £80-£120.

--------------------------------------------------
Universal Music
Universal Music is calling him "The Kid of Pop". Who is he? He is 13yr old Jay-Kid aka Yannick. The Danish young star who has been signed to Universal Music has recorded an album of Michael Jackson cover songs entitled "Bringing Back the Magic”.” They are the toughest songs to do, but hey, nobody said it would be easy. I just hope Michael Jackson will be pleased" comments Jay Kid. To find out more about Jay Kid watch the performer in action online at his official website.

--------------------------------------------------
Times Daily
Singer Michael Jackson is a fan of mariachi music and Acapulco, a Mexico City newspaper reported Tuesday. El Universal quoted an unidentified fan as saying he dressed as a waiter and sneaked into a party Jackson was attending while on vacation at the Mexican resort. The fan, described only as a boy from Acapulco who was a member of Jacksons Mexican fan club, said he watched the singer enjoy live mariachi music and sip a glass of water. The paper published photographs of the singer posing with friends. It said he liked the resort so much he plans to come back later this year. Jackson reportedly stayed at a house in Las Brisas, an exclusive subdivision perched on the hillside above Acapulco Bay, during a visit in April. The Official Michael Jackson Fan Club of Mexico reported that the pop-music star also hung out at the Enigma disco.

--------------------------------------------------
E Entertainment
An expanded two-hour episode offers a warts-and-all take on Michael Jackson as family, friends and journalists weigh in on the Gloved One. Few entertainment icons divide the public as much as the enigmatic King of Pop, but after 33 years in the spotlight, he is still a compelling figure. Topics include his musical achievements; volatile relationships with his father and brothers. Also featured on the show Jane Fonda, Jermaine Jackson and Corey Feldman. The show will air on Sunday 8th June 2003 at 8.00pm on E Entertainment in the U.S.

--------------------------------------------------
ABC News
Whilst the tabloid media speculate and comment on a forthcoming lawsuit, Brian Oxman who has been the Jackson family attorney for more than 14 years appeared on Good Morning America today. Defending the King of Pop, Mr.Oxman had this to say about tabloid rumors of bankruptcy: “I have been with this family for going on a decade and a half. And what I have seen during that time period is that Michael is one of the most generous, one of them most magnificent individuals I have ever seen. When people perform services for him, my observation is he doubles and he triples what he pays to them, but when they do not perform these services and they fail, he does not want to pay them a dime, and I do not blame him, and that is what I see here and I can only tell you that Michael will not pay for services he does not get.” Mr.Oxman continues “I have seen no evidence of that whatsoever. When we talk about people like Michael and his finances and being around this family and just being an objective observer and seeing how he functions, I see no evidence of that whatsoever. You mention Bank of America, one of the most CONSERVATIVE banks in America, when they anointed Michael with the loan its because he has the financial wherewithal. They do not give loans to people who are in financial trouble. They do not have to.” Mr.Oxman finished by saying “I am disturbed about this plaintiff who has to take this case to the public, apparently that’s an indication to me, that they are in trouble in this case. I wont comment on the evidence, but I will tell you about Michael and Michael is Rocky in the 6th round, he only gets stronger when he is being attacked and when I look at these plaintiffs and the things that they have done, you mentioned gloves, theyre hands are so dirty in all their dealings that they could not possibly wear a white glove and its just impossible to see why they are taking this case and trying to defame Michael in the press.”


--------------------------------------------------
Ad Week
Apple Hits the Right Notes, By Barbara Lippert. "Apples fun new music spots are not as simple as they look. In 1970, when the Jackson Fives "Ill Be There" was a hit single, my brother persuaded me that the songs opening line was, "You and I must make a pack." So, during the "Where there is love" part of the lyrics, I always pictured wolves. This came back to me when I saw the remarkably simple, fresh and lyrical spot for iTunes featuring a young woman, Nava, singing that very same number. She stands shyly against the white space, her freckles illuminated under the light, cradling her iPod and raising her voice in song. Unlike most people singing with earphones, or your typical deadly karaoker, she has a delicate, lilting voice and sings on key. The purity of her tone made me think of Michael Jackson in a new way—that he was only 11 when he sang it and sounded so old and wise. After singing prettily, Nava gets self-conscious and laughs and stops. Thats a lot to get out of a spot selling legally downloadable music for 99 cents a pop." Use the following weblink below to watch Apples new advertisement.

--------------------------------------------------

We can officially confirm that R&B pop princess Ashanti has not recorded a duet with the "King Of Pop" Michael Jackson. Further more, a song entitled "Get You Out Of My Mind" that is currently circulating the internet - is not a recording produced by Irv Gotti, neither does it feature Ashanti or the King Of Pop on vocals. This song is a fake.
--------------------------------------------------

New York Times
Speaking to the New York Times this week, lead singer "Karen O" of the American Rock Band "Yeah Yeah Yeahs" talk about her influences in music. "I also loved Michael Jackson. Off the Wall is still one of my favorite records. I am fascinated by pop stars who seem to come from another planet. David Bowie, Bjork, Michael Jackson -- they are like aliens. They have made their own reality." Do you pattern yourself after female rock stars or male rock stars? "Well, there have been so few female rock stars. I can count them on my right hand. When I was young, it was more appropriate for girls to imitate Madonna, but I always wanted to be Michael Jackson. I wanted to wear the glove."
--------------------------------------------------

Apple Mac has produced "iTunes" which acts as an MP3 Player. The brand new service that Apple offers includes downloading music from the "King of Pop". With a licence to the catalogue of material, songs can be downloaded for 99 cents per song. For more information go to: http://www.apple.com/itunes
--------------------------------------------------

Indy Star
A day after illness aborted lawyers attempts to question Michael Jackson, a federal judge told attorneys the King of Pop has to return for his deposition within three weeks. Grover B. Davis, an attorney involved in the case, said U.S. District Judge Philip P. Simon also told Jacksons attorneys to file papers documenting the illness that led to the cancellation of Wednesdays deposition. Davis said the deposition, which was being taken at the Canterbury Hotel, never got underway. Scheduled to start at 2 p.m, the deposition was put on hold from 3:30 to 5:30 as eight attorneys and the three people suing Jackson waited to see if the singers health would improve. At 5:45 p.m., the attempt to question Jackson was called off, said Davis, who represents the Brunswick Record Corp. "He felt weak and tired and it got worse as the day went on," Jacksons publicist Stuart Backerman told The Star. Brian Oxman, a long-time attorney for the Jackson family, said depositions are upsetting to Jackson. "He does not like lawsuits. He does not eat and he does not take care of himself because he is so worried."
--------------------------------------------------

MJSTAR
Following a "sudden illness" that hospitalised the King of Pop whilst staying in Indiana, Michael Jackson returned home safely today. The King of Pop is now recovering at home in Neverland and will be joined shortly by one of his closest friends.
--------------------------------------------------

Indy Star
Michael Jackson became ill and was treated at a hospital in Indianapolis before leaving for California Wednesday night, his publicist said. Jacksons illness led to the cancellation of a court-ordered deposition in a copyright-infringement lawsuit, attorney Brian Oxman told The Star. "He felt weak and tired and it got worse as the day went on," publicist Stuart Backerman told The Star. It was unclear how long the deposition would be delayed. Backerman said he did not know how attorneys for the plaintiffs in the lawsuit reacted to news of Jacksons illness. Those attorneys could not be reached late Wednesday. "What it comes down to is, Michael does not like depositions," said Oxman, who has represented the Jackson family for about 15 years. "He does not like lawsuits. He doesnt eat and he doesnt take care of himself because he is so worried." Oxman did not know which hospital Jackson, 44, was taken to. A source told The Star that Jackson was admitted to Methodist Hospital under an assumed name. A Methodist Hospital spokeswoman said they had no patient by the name of Michael Jackson. Federal regulations prohibit hospitals from releasing information without the patients consent. Oxman said Jacksons illness has forced the singer to cancel a trip planned for today to Gary, where he grew up. Jackson was to receive the key to the city and visit the house where he grew up. It would have been Jacksons first trip back to Gary in 20 years, Backerman said. "It was going to be a very positive, warm, emotional celebration," he said. "Believe me, he wanted to do that very badly." Jackson arrived Tuesday and had been staying Downtown at the Canterbury Hotel. He left by private jet from Indianapolis International Airport.
--------------------------------------------------

Indy Star
Michael Jackson became ill and was hospitalized in Indianapolis on Wednesday, his attorney said. Jackson, 44, was in the city for a court-ordered deposition in a copyright-infringement lawsuit, but that deposition did not take place, attorney Brian Oxman told The Star. Stuart Backerman, a publicist for Jackson, said Jackson had left the hospital and planned to fly out of the city on Wednesday night. It was unclear how long the deposition would be delayed. "What it comes down to is, Michael does not like depositions," said Oxman. "He does not like lawsuits. He does not eat and he does not take care of himself because he is so worried." Oxman did not know which hospital Jackson was taken to. A source told The Star that Jackson was admitted to Methodist Hospital under an assumed name. A Methodist Hospital spokeswoman told The Star: "We have no patient by that name." New federal regulations prohibit hospitals from releasing information without the patients consent. Oxman said Jacksons illness has forced the singer to cancel a trip planned for today to Gary, where he grew up. Jackson arrived Tuesday and had been staying Downtown at the Canterbury Hotel. A crowd of fans gathered outside the hotel all day, hoping to catch a glimpse of the singing star, unaware of his illness. The lawsuit, filed in federal court in northern Indiana, alleges that two songs on a 1996 album labeled as early Jackson 5 recordings actually were performed by another group, Ripples & Waves.
--------------------------------------------------

Indy Star
Except for the television news cameras pointing across the street, a motorist passing by the Canterbury Hotel this morning might not have known Shalonda Lilly and her two children were there, hoping to glimpse of the King of Pop. The crowd outside the swank Downtown hotel was small but determined -- and scattered. For a while this morning, Cynthia Wolfe had the corner of Illinois and Maryland streets to herself. From that vantage, she could eye simultaneously a Maryland Street garage entrance, where she believed Michael Jackson had entered on Tuesday, and the hotels front door on Illinois. She was still upset that she had missed his arrival, having ducked into Circle Centre Mall for a cappuccino when the limousines pulled up. "I am here because he is talented. He is very gifted," Wolfe said. The crowd grew slightly as the day progressed and word spread that the Jackson was still inside, answering questions from attorneys. A federal judge in the Northern District of Indiana ordered the pop star to be in Indianapolis today for a 2 p.m. deposition. Music producer Gordon Keith, whose real name is William Adams, members of a singing group known as Ripples & Waves and a record company filed a trademark and copyright infringement lawsuit in 1997 claiming that two tracks on a 1996 album, "Pre-History: The Lost Steeltown Recordings" were theirs. The six-year-old lawsuit is only now nearing the trial stage, and in April, Adams and the other plaintiffs asked the court to sanction Jackson for failing to appear in Indiana to answer their questions. The court issued a new order, commanding Jacksons appearance today. Lilly, 34, who brought her daughter Shaneta Graves, 14, and her son Tylin Lilly, 7, in the morning was prepared to stay several hours if necessary to see Jackson. There was a flurry of excitement in the morning when someone waved from an upstairs room. But it was not Jackson. "I am a big fan of Michael Jackson," said Lilly. "I have been following him ever since I was in junior high." Her daughter tried to hand the hotel doorkeeper a note for Jackson, but the folded piece of lined school paper was refused. "I am a real big fan of yours," Shanetas hand-printed message said. "I was wondering if you could help me out with becoming famous." Shaneta said she wanted to visit Jacksons Neverland Ranch in California, and her mother said she would let her go -- if she went along, too. In the early morning, interns "Bobo" and "Dude" from WNOU (93.1) came by the hotel to stage a bit of street theater, relayed by cell phone, for the Wank & OBrien morning show. The skit traded on the uproar that arose last year when Jackson dangled his infant son from a fourth-floor balcony in a Berlin hotel. As one tossed a stuffed pink baby doll into the air, the other caught it with a fish net. Program director David Edgar said the interns had been out practicing the day before, too. "We wanted to make sure that we were prepared, in case we were needed," he said. Jacksons fans, however, were convinced that their star has been mistreated badly. Erica A. Eckensberger, 32, had been waiting patiently outside the Canterbury since 7 a.m. She brought along a 2002 Michael Jackson calendar, hoping to get his autograph. "I think I connect with him because of his childhood and my childhood," she said. "He is a survivor."
--------------------------------------------------

Post Trib
On orders from U.S. District Court in Hammond, Jackson is supposed to give his deposition in a trade name and copyright infringement lawsuit. Though the deposition is scheduled for 2 p.m., the exact location is under wraps. The secrecy, approved by a federal judge, was requested by the world-famous singer. Besides the secrecy for the specific location of the deposition, the deposition transcript is to be sealed. It isn’t clear what measures are being taken to keep “The Gloved One” from sticking out like a sore thumb in Indianapolis, as fans and media outlets scramble for a glimpse or an encounter. Meanwhile, Steeltown Records founder William Adams (also known as Gordon Keith), a plaintiff in the civil suit, said he does not mind that Jackson has a protective order. “But if you ask me,” Keith said, “we should be the ones protected.” Keith said he and his nephew and co-plaintiff, Elvy Woodard, have received several harassing phone calls last year and earlier this year. The callers demanded that they “drop the lawsuit,” Keith said. “There were also things of a sexual nature to me pertaining to my wife, which I don’t have — I’ve been divorced for a while now,” Keith said. “All I said to the callers is God bless you and God help you.” Keith did not say he suspected that Michael Jackson was behind the calls.


more MJ news!!!!!!!
------------------------------------

SUNDAY 18 th AUGUST >> THE ARTICLE THE MEDIA WILL NOT PRINT
This is a world exclusive. The following article is the very same article a British national newspaper chose NOT to publish, after agreeing to do so in the first place. Once again, Uri Geller's momentous strength and support for Michael Jackson continues with the publication "Michael Jackson by Uri Geller". A wonderful piece, and a message that we hope all the Michael Jackson fans worldwide will spread. Please, if you are a fan of Michael's MJSTAR would love for you to cut and paste the following article and use it. Spread the word. If you would like MJSTAR to email you the story please contact us as soon as possible: NEWS@MJSTAR.COM



WORLD EXCLUSIVE - Michael Jackson by Uri Geller

The crush inside the vast record store on Oxford Street was getting scary. I wanted to back out, but the bodyguards behind me had linked elbows. We had to push forwards, through the press of screaming, chanting faces: "My-curl, My-curl, My-curl!" People were laughing and crying at the same time. A young man was jostled to the front of the crowd, a mobile phone pressed to his ear. He was yelling, "You won't believe this, Mum! Michael Jackson is right in front of me, I wish you could see him!" And Michael reached out gently, took the phone and whispered, "Hi, who is this? Yes, really, this is me." The chanting hushed as the whole store strained to hear Michael's murmured conversation. I heard him say, "I love you more," and then he handed back the phone, and the screaming started again. Outside, a surge of fans almost knocked an elderly woman off her feet as Michael emerged. There were at least 2000 people, and for the woman - who was, I discovered later, simply a passer-by - this must have been terrifying. What happened next, you may not believe. I have proof, because my brother-in-law, Shipi, was filming the scene from the 'chase' car, the bodyguard vehicle parked behind Michael's limo. Michael Jackson is a big man - in my imagination, before I met him, he was a man-child, but in reality he is nearly six feet tall with hands like a baseball catcher. He reached out an arm to steady the woman, and then half led, half carried her to the cars. The throng was too tight around the limo, so Michael ushered her into the chase car, and Shipi kept filming as Michael, very shyly, very formally, introduced himself. The woman, who might have been 80, acted with the poise characteristic of her generation, and politely demanded to be taken to her friend's house in Wimpole Street. So the biggest-selling black artist in history turned bus boy and, as they inched through the traffic, Michael told her all about his beloved children, and how badly he missed them.

The besotted frenzy of the crowd took a much darker turn hours later on Paddington's Platform Eight. Our limo pulled up beside our carriage on the Royal Train, which we had hired to take us to a charity spectacular at my football club, Exeter City. As we climbed out, Michael was separated from his minders. A knot of people lunged forward, and I saw him stumble. For a sickening moment he was out of sight amid the threshing bodies. I realised, with a lurch of horror, that he could have been kicked down onto the tracks, into the wheels. I was sweating with anxiety when he emerged, ten seconds later, scrambling under the arms of the fans with their posters and placards. We sprinted for the carriage door and I helped him through. He tumbled into a seat, his hair plastered to his face. I felt so badly for him that I couldn't even trust myself to ask if he was all right. He always calls me by my full name - not "Uri", not "Yuri" as the Americans say it, not "Geller" (as Shipi does when he is cross with me!). Michael invariably addresses me as "Uri Geller." And I had a sick certainty he was going to tell me, "Uri Geller, I could have been killed, and it was your dumb, stupid fault." But what he actually said, with a beatific grin that made me burst out laughing with relief, was: "I'm OK, Uri Geller. Don't worry. Don't be angry with the people out there, because they didn't know what they were doing. And I love them." I'm Jewish, but at that moment I thought of another man who said, "Forgive them, for they know not what they do." And if that sounds ludicrous, it's because you don't know Michael. It's not as though I've known him for ever.

Back when the Jackson Five were ruling the charts, and when Michael was storming to the King of Pop's throne, I would have loved to have met him. He just never went to parties. And when enemies turned on him in the Nineties, I could smell the stench of an establishment fit-up, because I'd taken a serious kicking from people who used the same foul weapons - slander campaigns, innuendo, trial by media. I thank God the mudslingers haven't aimed the kind of dirt and filth at me that Michael has suffered. We were introduced by Mohammed Al Fayed, who is happy to be the man who owns Michael's favourite shop. People ask where Mo gets the millions to finance Fulham FC - they haven't seen Michael go shopping. He cuts a swathe through department stores like a bulldozer in a china shop. And I mean bulldozer: whole counters are wiped clean. I was with him in the toy department when a bodyguard mentioned his two step-children - that guy is a world champion kick-boxer, with the muscles to match the belts, but it took him three trips to get all his packages down to the cars. Somewhere in Devon, two kids own every fragment of Star Wars merchandise on the market. Michael adores Star Wars. For our first meeting, I flew to New York, where he was recording Invincible, his million album which was finally released last year. We were quickly friends, and he asked me to design part of the CD artwork. Later, we took his children to a private screening of Star Wars episode one, the Phantom Menace. Michael was agog in the seat next to me, whispering his favourite lines - but at one instant, when I turned to point out some detail, he was gone. I sat back, sadly. I thought I knew what this was: the silent goodbye of a man too shy for farewells. My new friend didn't want to send me off with false smiles and empty promises. We probably wouldn't meet again. But then I caught a movement at the edge of my vision and turned to see Michael at the back of the cinema, blissed out in his doll-like dancing, grooving on the soundtrack of Star Wars. He slips into fragments of song all the time - in the lift, in hotel corridors, in the car. Just as it is a revelation to watch him dancing for fun, it is insanely wonderful to hear that voice swinging a few bars of some soul standard.

Maybe if I'd ever seen Fred Astaire hot-step across a hotel lobby, if I'd ever overheard Sinatra shoo-bee-doo-bee-bopping to a blonde in a dark corner of a Vegas bar, I might have felt the same thrill. Maybe. Now there is open warfare with his record company, Sony. Industry insiders believe the real issue is not Michael's career but his ownership of the richest back catalogue in the business - the Lennon-McCartney songs. Michael believes the suits are enraged beyond all reason that a black man holds the gaudiest prize in their world. He also believes the Beatles rights are a bagatelle beside his own crown jewels - his children. When he flew to England in June for his Exeter speech, he desperately wanted to bring his children. And knew he couldn't. The paparazzi would have ripped him apart to get pictures of those beautiful kids. I believe Michael envies what John Lennon did when Sean was born, stepping back from his career and spending four or five years as a full-time parent. The brutal ambitions of his father for the Jackson children is well known. I have never asked Michael about his childhood, because when I am with friends I am interested only in the present moment. But my mother's ancestor, Sigmund Freud, would not have found it difficult to see the connection between a childhood all at sea on heaving emotions, and a father who insists on being a rock for his own children. For such a gently spoken man, Michael is hard as granite when protecting his son and his daughter. That love finds an echo in his affection for his fans. They shout out, "Michael, we love you," and he always answers, "I love you more." I have seen him shrug off his bodyguards to step into a crowd who had waited through a downpour to see him - he signed every poster, every album, and stood there for 20 minutes, listening to the fans' stories, until he was shivering. His foot was in bandages that day, because of a broken bone.

Later, I saw the dressing was sodden. It must have been agony, but his face never showed it. Oh yeah, his face - that's what everyone asks about. And this always shuts them up: "Ask me anything," I say, "but ask yourself first why you feel free to comment on his colour and his looks, when you profess that you never judge anyone by their skin or their face." He changes his hotel room every few days, and I have to remember next time I call to ask for Mr Robinson instead of Mr Brown or Mr Williams. With each switch, he checks all the drawers and cupboards himself. "Lost your passport?" I joked once. "I don't want to leave any gifts behind," he told me earnestly. He keeps everything his fans give him. I couldn't credit this at first, but he truly keeps everything, and always has. If you ever gave Michael a drawing, or a letter, or a soft toy, a jewellery case overflowing with diadems or a plastic hat from McDonalds, he has kept it. "I have packets of M&Ms from 30 years ago," he promised me. "Some day, I'll build a museum for it all." This week, I have been talking with senior engineers from a space agency, about an eight-year plan to finance a base on the moon by enrolling some of America's super-rich into a private space race. The idea was Michael's: "I want to moonwalk," he said one day, and I told him not to be embarrassed about dancing when I was around. "No, see, really. I want to walk on the moon." There is no doubt that this extraordinary man will get exactly what he wants. The man in the moon better expect a visit. And the suits in the music industry can expect more rockets too.

PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD, FEEL FREE TO CUT AND PASTE THIS ARTICLE! STOP THE TABLOIDS!




14075